Tag Archives: MLK

Indivisible & MLK

Dear Indivisibles,

Our communities are at the heart of this movement. Taking action in our communities, in our districts, in our states to build long-lasting local power.

Why? Because when we all build our power locally, our collective power can change what’s politically possible.

This year, alongside our daily Indivisible work, we want to highlight the importance of giving back to our communities in the form of service. That’s why this January 21, Indivisible is proud to partner with the Corporation for National & Community Service to support volunteer projects happening across the country as a part of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service.

Service to our communities is at the heart of everything we do as a movement, and we invite everyone to take part and honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy.

Here’s what you can do this MLK Day:

Check out the MLK Day events near you at MLKday.gov. If there’s a service opportunity in your area, talk to your local Indivisible group, friends, and family about attending together.

Plan your own event! If there’s not an event currently near you, you can also plan your own service project. Be sure to register your event on MLKday.gov to help others find your project and spread the word, as well as registering on the Indivisible event map. For more resources and ideas, check out this event toolkit prepared by Global Citizen.

More than ever, we need to hold tight to the values of justice and freedom that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. espoused in his life. By weaving service into our lives as Indivisibles, we honor Dr. King’s legacy by giving back to our communities on January 21 and beyond.

In solidarity,

Indivisible Team

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Martin Luther King’s Nobel Speech Is an Often Ignored Masterpiece

The Daily Beast, 1/20/14

When Martin Luther King accepted his Nobel Prize, he delivered a speech that has been unfairly ignored because his delivery was so muted. Read 50 years later, it is electrifying.

Martin Luther King’s gifts were manifest. He was an inspired leader, a galvanizing orator, and a brilliant polemicist and prose writer. But more than anything, he knew how to rise to an occasion.

On December 10, 1964, when he received the Nobel Peace Prize, he knew the world was watching. He knew that he was the public face of the American civil rights movement, and that everything he said would be weighed and judged, sometimes harshly. Put in that position, almost any of us would tremble. But King just stepped up to the podium and delivered one of the finest speeches of his life.

“I accept the Nobel Prize for Peace at a moment when 22 million Negroes of the United States of America are engaged in a creative battle to end the long night of racial injustice,” he began. “I accept this award on behalf of a civil rights movement, which is moving with determination and a majestic scorn for risk and danger to establish a reign of freedom and a rule of justice. I am mindful that only yesterday in Birmingham, Alabama, our children, crying out for brotherhood, were answered with fire hoses, snarling dogs and even death. I am mindful that only yesterday in Philadelphia, Mississippi, young people seeking to secure the right to vote were brutalized and murdered. And only yesterday more than 40 houses of worship in the State of Mississippi alone were bombed or burned because they offered a sanctuary to those who would not accept segregation. I am mindful that debilitating and grinding poverty afflicts my people and chains them to the lowest rung of the economic ladder.”

King’s prose, like Lincoln’s, is plain and straightforward, and yet supple enough to allow him to range from a whisper to thunder in the space of a few lines.

King was already famous as an orator, having delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech before hundreds of thousands of people a year earlier….

continue reading at The Daily Beast

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Filed under Rights, Justice, Law

Occupy Wall Street & MLK

from The Other 98%

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Filed under Economy, Labor, Tax