Monthly Archives: January 2019

Draft Statement of Conscience–Democracy Uncorrupted

Unitarian Universalist Association

“Democracy is a name for a life of free and enriching communion.” -John Dewey

Democracy in the U.S. has always been compromised. At the Nation’s very founding, only white male land owners were allowed to participate in governance. Wealth was created from those excluded: the seizure of land from indigenous peoples who were forcibly removed and exterminated, enslaved Africans, and exploited labor from indentured servants, immigrants, prisoners, and the working poor. As people of faith committed to “the right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within our congregations and in society at large,” we must strive toward uncorrupted democracy.

As a means to an end, democracy organizes consensus among diverse people and preserves stability while balancing competing interests. But democracy is not merely a means. It is an end in itself, an ethical ideal, a moral and spiritual way of relating to one another.

The promise of democracy is for a life that fashions us as the people we want to be. Terry Tempest Williams asks: “Can we be equitable? Can we be generous? Can we listen with our whole beings, not just our minds, and offer our attention rather than our opinions? And do we have enough resolve in our hearts to act courageously, relentlessly, without giving up – ever – trusting our fellow citizens to join with us in our determined pursuit of a living democracy?” She calls us to be equitable, and generous, attentive to one another, resolute and courageous in our trust. If democracy has sometimes seemed, as Winston Churchill said, “the worst form of government except for all those other forms,” it is because democracy has been limited and constrained – merely a means for giving powerful interests the appearance of legitimacy….

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Indivisible & MLK

Dear Indivisibles,

Our communities are at the heart of this movement. Taking action in our communities, in our districts, in our states to build long-lasting local power.

Why? Because when we all build our power locally, our collective power can change what’s politically possible.

This year, alongside our daily Indivisible work, we want to highlight the importance of giving back to our communities in the form of service. That’s why this January 21, Indivisible is proud to partner with the Corporation for National & Community Service to support volunteer projects happening across the country as a part of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service.

Service to our communities is at the heart of everything we do as a movement, and we invite everyone to take part and honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy.

Here’s what you can do this MLK Day:

Check out the MLK Day events near you at MLKday.gov. If there’s a service opportunity in your area, talk to your local Indivisible group, friends, and family about attending together.

Plan your own event! If there’s not an event currently near you, you can also plan your own service project. Be sure to register your event on MLKday.gov to help others find your project and spread the word, as well as registering on the Indivisible event map. For more resources and ideas, check out this event toolkit prepared by Global Citizen.

More than ever, we need to hold tight to the values of justice and freedom that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. espoused in his life. By weaving service into our lives as Indivisibles, we honor Dr. King’s legacy by giving back to our communities on January 21 and beyond.

In solidarity,

Indivisible Team

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